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This Chef Broke the Guinness Record by Cooking for 53 Hours Straight

This Chef Broke the Guinness Record by Cooking for 53 Hours Straight


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The chef performed the marathon on a stage in front of the public

The chef strategically planned twenty 100-gram recipes per hour to make the record.

This weekend, Vishnu Manohar, a celebrity chef in India, broke the Guinness World Record for longest cooking marathon, clocking in at 53 consecutive hours. The former title holder was Benjamin J. Perry in Lincoln, Rhode Island, who cooked for 40 hours in 2014.

According to The Times of India, the marathon started at 8 a.m. Manohar finished up and served is last dish at 5:30 p.m. almost two days later.

Manohar said that he was used to cooking for extended amounts of time when shooting for his TV shows, and he continued to train for the marathon by cooking round the clock.

Meghana Kumhare, a nutritionist, told The Times of India that the chef’s preparation began a month before the event and even involved a planned eating regimen.

“For last three days I had put him on a protein diet and then a carbon loading cycle to maintain high energy levels,” Kumhare said. “He was also given a lot of liquids like buttermilk and plain water to prevent dehydration, considering the heat at this time. His energy levels remained superb.”


Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Michael Bourdain ( / b ɔːr ˈ d eɪ n / June 25, 1956 – June 8, 2018) was an American celebrity chef, book author, and travel documentarian, [1] [2] [3] who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. [4] Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens during his career, which included many years spent as an executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan. He first became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000).

His first food and world-travel television show A Cook's Tour ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel's culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013). In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. Though best known for his culinary writings and television presentations, along with several books on food and cooking and travel adventures, Bourdain also wrote both fiction and historical nonfiction. On June 8, 2018, Bourdain died by suicide while on location in France for Parts Unknown. [5]


Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Michael Bourdain ( / b ɔːr ˈ d eɪ n / June 25, 1956 – June 8, 2018) was an American celebrity chef, book author, and travel documentarian, [1] [2] [3] who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. [4] Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens during his career, which included many years spent as an executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan. He first became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000).

His first food and world-travel television show A Cook's Tour ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel's culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013). In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. Though best known for his culinary writings and television presentations, along with several books on food and cooking and travel adventures, Bourdain also wrote both fiction and historical nonfiction. On June 8, 2018, Bourdain died by suicide while on location in France for Parts Unknown. [5]


Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Michael Bourdain ( / b ɔːr ˈ d eɪ n / June 25, 1956 – June 8, 2018) was an American celebrity chef, book author, and travel documentarian, [1] [2] [3] who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. [4] Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens during his career, which included many years spent as an executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan. He first became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000).

His first food and world-travel television show A Cook's Tour ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel's culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013). In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. Though best known for his culinary writings and television presentations, along with several books on food and cooking and travel adventures, Bourdain also wrote both fiction and historical nonfiction. On June 8, 2018, Bourdain died by suicide while on location in France for Parts Unknown. [5]


Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Michael Bourdain ( / b ɔːr ˈ d eɪ n / June 25, 1956 – June 8, 2018) was an American celebrity chef, book author, and travel documentarian, [1] [2] [3] who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. [4] Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens during his career, which included many years spent as an executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan. He first became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000).

His first food and world-travel television show A Cook's Tour ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel's culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013). In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. Though best known for his culinary writings and television presentations, along with several books on food and cooking and travel adventures, Bourdain also wrote both fiction and historical nonfiction. On June 8, 2018, Bourdain died by suicide while on location in France for Parts Unknown. [5]


Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Michael Bourdain ( / b ɔːr ˈ d eɪ n / June 25, 1956 – June 8, 2018) was an American celebrity chef, book author, and travel documentarian, [1] [2] [3] who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. [4] Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens during his career, which included many years spent as an executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan. He first became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000).

His first food and world-travel television show A Cook's Tour ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel's culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013). In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. Though best known for his culinary writings and television presentations, along with several books on food and cooking and travel adventures, Bourdain also wrote both fiction and historical nonfiction. On June 8, 2018, Bourdain died by suicide while on location in France for Parts Unknown. [5]


Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Michael Bourdain ( / b ɔːr ˈ d eɪ n / June 25, 1956 – June 8, 2018) was an American celebrity chef, book author, and travel documentarian, [1] [2] [3] who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. [4] Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens during his career, which included many years spent as an executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan. He first became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000).

His first food and world-travel television show A Cook's Tour ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel's culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013). In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. Though best known for his culinary writings and television presentations, along with several books on food and cooking and travel adventures, Bourdain also wrote both fiction and historical nonfiction. On June 8, 2018, Bourdain died by suicide while on location in France for Parts Unknown. [5]


Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Michael Bourdain ( / b ɔːr ˈ d eɪ n / June 25, 1956 – June 8, 2018) was an American celebrity chef, book author, and travel documentarian, [1] [2] [3] who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. [4] Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens during his career, which included many years spent as an executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan. He first became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000).

His first food and world-travel television show A Cook's Tour ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel's culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013). In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. Though best known for his culinary writings and television presentations, along with several books on food and cooking and travel adventures, Bourdain also wrote both fiction and historical nonfiction. On June 8, 2018, Bourdain died by suicide while on location in France for Parts Unknown. [5]


Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Michael Bourdain ( / b ɔːr ˈ d eɪ n / June 25, 1956 – June 8, 2018) was an American celebrity chef, book author, and travel documentarian, [1] [2] [3] who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. [4] Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens during his career, which included many years spent as an executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan. He first became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000).

His first food and world-travel television show A Cook's Tour ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel's culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013). In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. Though best known for his culinary writings and television presentations, along with several books on food and cooking and travel adventures, Bourdain also wrote both fiction and historical nonfiction. On June 8, 2018, Bourdain died by suicide while on location in France for Parts Unknown. [5]


Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Michael Bourdain ( / b ɔːr ˈ d eɪ n / June 25, 1956 – June 8, 2018) was an American celebrity chef, book author, and travel documentarian, [1] [2] [3] who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. [4] Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens during his career, which included many years spent as an executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan. He first became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000).

His first food and world-travel television show A Cook's Tour ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel's culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013). In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. Though best known for his culinary writings and television presentations, along with several books on food and cooking and travel adventures, Bourdain also wrote both fiction and historical nonfiction. On June 8, 2018, Bourdain died by suicide while on location in France for Parts Unknown. [5]


Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Michael Bourdain ( / b ɔːr ˈ d eɪ n / June 25, 1956 – June 8, 2018) was an American celebrity chef, book author, and travel documentarian, [1] [2] [3] who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. [4] Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens during his career, which included many years spent as an executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan. He first became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000).

His first food and world-travel television show A Cook's Tour ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel's culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013). In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. Though best known for his culinary writings and television presentations, along with several books on food and cooking and travel adventures, Bourdain also wrote both fiction and historical nonfiction. On June 8, 2018, Bourdain died by suicide while on location in France for Parts Unknown. [5]


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